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What the Buddha Really Meant

ACI 15: The Art of Interpretation with Hector Marcel

Thursdays 7:30 - 9:45PM  |  Mar 30 - Jun 29

Dive deep into the study of emptiness and learn the art of interpreting what the Buddha really meant.

Based upon The Commentary on the True Intention of the Sutras (Dode Gong Drel) and The Sutra Requested by the Arya Named Never- Ending Wisdom (Pakpa Lodru Misepe Shupay Do) by Shakyamuni Buddha, with a commentary from The Essence of Eloquence on the Art of Interpretation (Drange Lekshe Nyingpo) by Je Tsongkapa (1357- 1419).

Topics include: The importance of evaluating spiritual teachings, how to interpret when spiritual teachings are literal or figurative, how to evaluate apparently conflicting teachings, a summary of the teachings Lord Buddha gave in each of the three Turnings of the Wheel of the Dharma, the goal of each of the three Turnings of the Wheel, an explanation of the ideas held by each of the main schools of Buddhism, ultimate reality (emptiness) according to each of the schools, the three progressively higher understandings of emptiness, the three attributes of reality, a comparison of the Mind- Only School and the Middle- Way School explanations of emptiness and dependent origination, how to use an understanding of emptiness to stop all your suffering, and how to stop your aging and death by stopping your ignorance.

ALL WELCOME. This is course 15 of 18 open sutra courses. Drop-ins are most certainly welcome too. There are no prerequisites for this series - just a burning passion to understand the experience of Life on this planet.

Dharma is always offered free of charge, but if you'd like to keep the Three Jewels alive and thriving in NYC, become a member for only $30/month, or $15 suggested for drop-ins.

Hector Marcel has been teaching Asian Classics Institute courses since 2012. He embodies Buddhist practice in his lively application of its principles in his personal and professional life. He is a Change Management Consultant helping executives drive transformational change in their organizations through an emphasis on culture, people and service. He is the founder of a non-profit called the 108 Lives Project, which makes annual pilgrimage to Kathmandu to practice Buddhist principles of compassion and giving. Hector is treasured by his students for his immense kindness, humor, and generous wisdom.